How to Eat Gluten-Free

The inability to digest gluten causes inflammation and damage to the mucosal linings of the intestines and other mucous membranes in the body. This is the starting point of problems for an individual with an adverse reaction to gluten.

Gluten, Wheat, and Grains

Gluten is a type of protein that is found in many bread, cereal, and pasta grains such as wheat, rye, barley and spelt.  Gluten helps to raise bread when baked as well as make it chewy when eaten.

Wheat free is NOT always Gluten Free.  Many ingredients besides wheat contain gluten.

Gluten is a very common food allergy.  Research has demonstrated that 40% of Americans have some degree of negative reaction to gluten.  Gluten is very hard for us to digest and can be one of the main causes of inflammation in the digestive system and the body.  Complete intolerance of gluten is called Celiac’s Disease.  Affecting 1% of the population, Celiac’s Disease is severe enough that a person cannot ingest any gluten without symptoms.

The inability to digest gluten causes inflammation and damage to the mucosal linings of the intestines and other mucous membranes in the body.  This is the starting point of problems for an individual with an adverse reaction to gluten.

Irritation and inflammation can lead to poor absorption of nutrients, digestive disturbance, and predispose you to other food allergies by causing leaky gut syndrome.  Low energy, weight gain or weight loss, skin rashes, and a host of other health problems (even without gastrointestinal symptoms) are common symptoms.

Gluten containing grains are:

  • Wheat, Rye, Barley, and Spelt primarily
  • Also: Semolina, Durum, Kamut, Graham, and Triticale

Other foods that often contain Gluten:

  • Barley Malt, Malt flavoring, Malt Vinegar
  • Beers, Ales, Lagers
  • Breading, Coating mixes
  • Broth, Soup mixes
  • Brown rice syrup
  • Cereal
  • Croutons
  • Dressing
  • Flour
  • Imitation meat or seafood products
  • Marinades
  • Pastas
  • Processed luncheon meats
  • Sauces, Gravies
  • Soy sauce or soy sauce solids
  • Stuffing
  • Thickeners

Non Gluten containing grains:

  • Oats, Millet, Quinoa, Buckwheat, Amaranth, Corn, and Rice
  • Soaking, sprouting, or fermenting are all traditional methods to reduce “anti-nutrients” that are concentrated in grains (and also beans and legumes).

Other foods that do not contain Gluten:

  • Nut, Rice, and Corn Flour
  • Potato, Beans, Tapioca
  • Sorghum, Arrowroot, and Teff

Gluten Free Skin Care

Be sure to check out Gluten-Free Savonnerie™, a premier source for allergen specific, paraben-free, hypoallergenic skin care.  Each of their products are designed to help those with Celiac disease, allergies, chemical sensitivities, autism, or troubled skin.

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